Viaduto do Chá (EN)

The first viaduct of São Paulo was opened in 1892, designed by the Frenchman Jules Martin. With a metal frame and wooden floor, it allowed expanding the city center beyond Vale do Anhangabaú [Anhangabau Valley], then a location of tea crops that gave name to the viaduct. In 1938, it was demolished and replaced by the present viaduct, with Art Deco lines, designed by architect Elisiário Bahia.

Curiosities:

– The name “Morro do Chá” [Tea Hil] was given to the region of the so-called Centro Novo [New Downtown] because there used to be a farm where Indian tea and vegetables were cultivated.

– Immediately after its inauguration, it was dubbed as “Viaduto dos Três Vinténs” [Viaduct of the Three Coins], in reference to the toll rate value that was charged for crossing of pedestrians. An undersigned petition sent to the City Council forced the City Hall to acquire the construction – which pertained to the Companhia Paulista do Viaduto do Chá [São Paulo Tea Viaduct Company] – to suspend collection.

– Passage over the viaduct offers two lovely views. On one of the sides, the Anhangabaú Valley can be observed with the Santa Ifigênia Viaduct, and the Mirante do Vale [Valley’s Belvedere] Building – the tallest in the city – at the end, as the Theatro Municipal [Opera House]. On the other side, Praça da Bandeira [Flag Square] can be seen, framed to the left by the Edifício Matarazzo [Matarazzo Building] and to the right by the Edifício Alexandre Mackenzie [Alexandre Mackenzie Building].

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Location: Viaduto do Chá connects Praça do Patriarca to Praça Ramos de Azevedo.